The Wild Mountains Trust is an independent, community focussed, non-profit organisation providing leadership in environmental education and conservation.

The Trust has acquired land south of Rathdowney adjoining the World Heritage Border Ranges National Park for a nature reserve and venue for education. On this magnificent site a world class Centre is being built. Here, using the unique purpose-built residential facility, quality experiential environmental education for the whole community will be provided.

In subtropical and eucalypt forests participants will have the opportunity to discover an amazing natural world. At the same time Wild Mountains can reinforce its educational programs with examples of renewable power generation.

UP COMING EVENTS

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MAR-

Members General Meeting 18th *not a member yet but want to find out more? Email lizz@wildmountains.org ,

Wild Water Celebration 22nd

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APR-

VW 27/28/29,

Earthkeepers ,

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We'd love to see you , drop us a line.

Recent News

Published:
Sunday, January 26, 2014

 

FaCEBOOK 

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Published:
Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Well another year and another great volunteer week. We welcomed some new faces and returning faces who show up during our Annual Volunteer Week for 2014.

Our Thanks goes out to - Luke, Natalie, Donna , Ben, Gen, Kony, Madeline, Cat, Will, Susan, Richard and Justin for all the good work carried out and last but not least Rowan( 20 months ) for the smiles and wielding of the hammer with “Ba Bang” sound effects!

Some of the work that went on was:

Outside ceiling lining FINISHED, making rafters from second hand timbers for the roof at Whiptail, wood splitting, LANTANA BASHING (a daisy for Ben), work on Wild Mountains Business Sponsorship kit for kids on Earthkeepers,...

Published:
Monday, January 20, 2014

At lunch we heard the roar. It seemed to go on and on crashing and tearing its way to the ground. Our initial impression was that it was close by and so I immediately searched along the trails around the centre. Nothing. A few days later Susan suggested it might have been the leaning fig so she, Lizz and Rowan went to investigate. After, they told me the inevitable had happened. I had to have a look for myself...

Up until then its majestic bulk was simply awe inspiring when viewed side on. The massive trunk angled at 45 degrees to the ground soaring over a deep wide gully. As with stranglers the stem was riddled with apertures that at some high point coalesced into a solid cylinder shooting vertically skyward and crowned by a dome of rich green leaves,...

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