Camp Creek Roundup

Published: 
Friday, May 27, 2016

Our April VW saw the final weekend of Stage 2 of our year long Camp Creek Headwaters Renewal Project. 

The creek and its catchment has a very different look now from that of some 12 months ago. Large swathes of lantana that formed monocultures of invasive weed within the rainforest and along the creek itself have now been cleared and replaced by a plethora of native species that are scrabbling toward the light. The healing process is underway and in  a few years should be resilient enough to re-establish as sub-tropical rainforest. We are encouraged as there is an area that we worked on after we first arrived at Wild Mountains where we also eradicated lantana and planted a few trees. Now some 25 years later it is (other than large trees), indistinguishable from the rest of the mature forest. So we are confident that slowly but surely the holes within the rainforest over which we have tenure will be gone.

We would like to thank all of our hard working volunteers who have blazed a way through the tangled mass and hacked, pulled, cut, beat and rolled lantana, who collected seed and potted up plants, who cut and made bamboo stakes by the hundreds, who planted trees and staked, mulched and watered them, who followed up with more weeding and watering nurturing the little guys and giving them and each other encouragement when getting a little scratchy or cut up, or wet or tired, hungry and thirsty while at all times keeping up moral and having fun. Know that when you come back in years to come that you will be able to walk in the forest you helped restore.

Also a big thanks for funding through an Everyone’s Environmental Grant from the Qld Dept of Environment and Heritage Protection supported by an environmental grant from the Scenic RIm Regional Council both of which helped us to fully focus on this project. This important work helps restore the buffer protecting the world heritage Gondwana Rainforest of Australia over the border from edge effects such as invasives, weather and fire. There is much more to be done however and over the next many years Wild Mountains will commit to this ongoing conservation project.

And of course we would love you to be part of it.

For the Earth - Richard Zoomers